Dear Readers,Thanks to all of you, we here at Prepaid Africa have been growing in leaps and bounds over the past 3 and half years since we started on Tumblr. There are almost 45,000 of you connected to us today.When we started it was by meeting the needs of the community - there were few places online where one could find inspirational news of economic and social development from the African continent.
Stories of achievement by strong leaders, women, young people… all of whom were doing their bit to change their communities, impact the world around them and so, make a difference. Now we find ourselves attempting to build a sustainable business model in order for us to be bettter able to offer a wider and deeper range of engaging services and products on our platform. Our sister site, Rise Africa, is in the midst of a transformation into a whole new way to reach out and engage with members of the African Diaspora and African communities. Imagine going to University in a different state or country and being able to find and connect with an Ezibota member.Imagine being part of a trusted community of global Africans wherever you were in the world.Our Member’s Directory is only one of many such services for the Ezibota community when we go live on October 2nd. Throughout the month of September we will be sharing more information about the changes that are soon to come. We urge you to stay tuned as we unveil all of the new opportunities that will be available with our new platform, products, and services. We hope you share in our excitement for all that’s in store.__________________________________________________________Mission: To create and maintain an organic sense of home while promoting African culture and commerceVision: A connected and empowered global African communityVisit ezibota.com to send us questions, comments, or any feedback you may have. Ed’s Note: We’re offering a limited time offer for all of you to take this opportunity for Lifetime membership by sending in any small amount to support our development efforts. We’re choosing community fundraising but not crowdfunding on public sites because you have been with us from the beginning. This is all about being part of a community you can trust.

Dear Readers,

Thanks to all of you, we here at Prepaid Africa have been growing in leaps and bounds over the past 3 and half years since we started on Tumblr. There are almost 45,000 of you connected to us today.

When we started it was by meeting the needs of the community - there were few places online where one could find inspirational news of economic and social development from the African continent.

Stories of achievement by strong leaders, women, young people… all of whom were doing their bit to change their communities, impact the world around them and so, make a difference.

Now we find ourselves attempting to build a sustainable business model in order for us to be bettter able to offer a wider and deeper range of engaging services and products on our platform.

Our sister site, Rise Africa, is in the midst of a transformation into a whole new way to reach out and engage with members of the African Diaspora and African communities.

Imagine going to University in a different state or country and being able to find and connect with an Ezibota member.

Imagine being part of a trusted community of global Africans wherever you were in the world.

Our Member’s Directory is only one of many such services for the Ezibota community when we go live on October 2nd.

Throughout the month of September we will be sharing more information about the changes that are soon to come. We urge you to stay tuned as we unveil all of the new opportunities that will be available with our new platform, products, and services. We hope you share in our excitement for all that’s in store.

__________________________________________________________


Mission: To create and maintain an organic sense of home while promoting African culture and commerce

Vision: A connected and empowered global African community

Visit ezibota.com to send us questions, comments, or any feedback you may have.


Ed’s Note: We’re offering a limited time offer for all of you to take this opportunity for Lifetime membership by sending in any small amount to support our development efforts. We’re choosing community fundraising but not crowdfunding on public sites because you have been with us from the beginning. This is all about being part of a community you can trust.

(Source: prepaidafrica)

Ethiopia decks out
Ethiopia has been working hard to expand industrial development and within that general framework, the textile sector has been identified as a priority area both by local investors and for foreign direct investment.
The country has a long history of manufacturing traditional textiles using hand-spun yarn and handlooms for weaving. It has also been a major source of employment for both rural and urban areas.
The Growth and Transformation Plan 2010–2015, earmarked the textile and garment industry as the first category under medium and large industrial development. Textiles also touch several Ethiopian sub-sectors, with the capacity to maximize cotton production, creating an even larger source of employment and being able to induce industrial modernization, as well as considerably raising foreign exchange export earnings.
The government believes the sector can lift its aggregate production value to $2.5 billion by the end of 2015. It has also set up the Textile Industry Development Institute on June 7, 2010. The Institute has the objectives of helping the development of textile and apparel industry technologies, and enabling the industry to become competitive and develop rapidly.
Other encouragements and supports have been put in place to boost the textile industry sector and facilitate the involvement of foreign investors in the wide-ranging prospects available for development. The government wants exports to top a billion dollars by 2016.
Investors are being encouraged from various countries and major global brands to relocate factories in Ethiopia.

Ethiopia decks out

Ethiopia has been working hard to expand industrial development and within that general framework, the textile sector has been identified as a priority area both by local investors and for foreign direct investment.

The country has a long history of manufacturing traditional textiles using hand-spun yarn and handlooms for weaving. It has also been a major source of employment for both rural and urban areas.

The Growth and Transformation Plan 2010–2015, earmarked the textile and garment industry as the first category under medium and large industrial development. Textiles also touch several Ethiopian sub-sectors, with the capacity to maximize cotton production, creating an even larger source of employment and being able to induce industrial modernization, as well as considerably raising foreign exchange export earnings.

The government believes the sector can lift its aggregate production value to $2.5 billion by the end of 2015. It has also set up the Textile Industry Development Institute on June 7, 2010. The Institute has the objectives of helping the development of textile and apparel industry technologies, and enabling the industry to become competitive and develop rapidly.

Other encouragements and supports have been put in place to boost the textile industry sector and facilitate the involvement of foreign investors in the wide-ranging prospects available for development. The government wants exports to top a billion dollars by 2016.

Investors are being encouraged from various countries and major global brands to relocate factories in Ethiopia.

The StartUp Scene in Rwanda

VENTURES AFRICA – Rising from the ashes of a deadly genocide two decades ago, Rwanda has transformed and positioned itself to become the most competitive economy in East Africa and 62nd globally; this rating beats that of Africa’s biggest economy, Nigeria, and East Africa’s regional hub for financial services and telecommunications, Kenya.


It’s relatively tiny land mass of 26, 338 square kilometers is sandwiched between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Tanzania, while also sharing a boundary with Uganda and a close proximity to Kenya. Looking rather insignificant when the entire view of the African continent is taken in, Rwanda’s potentials far exceeds its size, and this is evident in the kind of innovative ideas that are already springing up around the country.


Rwanda ranks well by a number of economic indicators, and this explains why it is beginning to host and incubate its own startups. Apart from its impressive rating by the World Economic Forum, the World Bank ranks Rwanda as the 32nd easiest economy to do business in globally, this ranking places Rwanda above the likes of the BRICS, Israel, and France. Specifically, It ranks highly in the areas of starting a business, registering property, getting credit and protecting investors; this makes it, in theory and structure, an excellent startup hub in East Africa.

A significant share of investors looking to invest in sub-Saharan Africa as a whole head towards Rwanda. Liquid Telecom has just declared its intentions in that directions and Swedish-based Telecom firm, Millicom, did same earlier in the year, saying it also plans to build a tech incubator called “Think” in order to attract ambitious entrepreneurs and provide seed funding of about $15,000, structured training and coaching sessions to boost their potential in return for equity in scalable businesses that emerge from the incubator.

No Man’s Job: Portraits of Senegal’s Female Auto Mechanics
Chocolate Is a Bittersweet Way of Life in Ghana
Alawe Fouleratou, a budding entrepreneur in the Central Bronx, took over an African food market and molded it to meet demand for a boutique. “If I don’t have it, I will bring it,” Fouleratou said, repeating the mantra she recites for customers.
From West Africa to the Bronx, a Retail Maven Dreams Big | NY City Lens
Assaha African Center and Market is located at 2388 Washington Ave. in Bathgate, Bronx.

Alawe Fouleratou, a budding entrepreneur in the Central Bronx, took over an African food market and molded it to meet demand for a boutique. “If I don’t have it, I will bring it,” Fouleratou said, repeating the mantra she recites for customers.

From West Africa to the Bronx, a Retail Maven Dreams Big | NY City Lens

Assaha African Center and Market is located at 2388 Washington Ave. in Bathgate, Bronx.

Lifetime Membership Offer

africaisdonesuffering:

We thank our current members awaiting our upcoming Oct 2nd launch and welcome anyone else interested in joining our community! https://ezibota.com/lifetime-member/#account/join

What is Ezibota?

Our sister site, Rise Africa, is in the midst of a transformation into a whole new way to reach out and engage with members of the African Diaspora and African communities.

Imagine going to University in a different state or country and being able to find and connect with an Ezibota member.

Imagine being part of a trusted community of global Africans wherever you were in the world.

Our Member’s Directory is only one of many such services for the Ezibota community when we go live on October 2nd.

Fashioning Africa: A First Class Designer’s Analysis Of Africa’s Fashion Industry

Sub-Saharan Africa: Emerging African Events Markets – Who Are The Next Generation? | International Meetings Review

South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania and Egypt have long been continental leaders in business events. These countries have seen continuous growth in the meetings sector as they ploughed into their respective industries.

But now a new breed of conference managers are emerging in Africa – and we’re not talking about Rwanda with its new convention centre or Zambia with its steady rise in hosting mining and agricultural exhibitions.

These countries are only just beginning to realise the impact that business events and incentives have on the economy and, as such, are only now getting serious about investing in the MICE industry.

Meet the Y generation in African business events.

How Java became East Africa’s largest coffee chain

While the growth and success of companies like Java and other consumer related businesses is often attributed to Africa’s growing middle class, Ashley says this narrative is “a little bit misleading” because the middle class is not that big in Kenya.

“I think here this middle class term is used loosely. I grew up in a middle class in the US. You could pump petrol and qualify to buy a house. Which service station attendant here can even pay rent without struggling?” he asks.

“There is no middle class I know of historically that had to send their kids to private school to get a decent education, or deal with mortgage rates of nearly 20%, or the levels of crime and lack of infrastructure.

“So this is a very unique middle class. They are hard-core survivors.
People who have had to overcome odds that are still stark.”

He notes Java customers are people who “have a certain income that allows them a quality of life that many can’t afford”. At Java a large cappuccino and muffin will cost you just about $4.5 while a lunch meal of chips, burger, vegetables on the side and a glass of juice would cost an average of $10.

“Yes, we grow because of Kenyans who are able to afford our products ̶ but I feel it almost an insult to call that group middle class. They are people who have overcome incredible obstacles just to get to where they are.”

Focusing on the Kenyan clientele

Although in the early days two-thirds of Java customers were expatriates and affluent Asians, today the outlets mostly attract a Kenyan crowd. Ashley says making Java “a Kenyan brand” was a key goal for its co-founders.

“We would have this case where a waiter would favour the expat tables to get a better tip because Kenyans were not as good tippers as maybe people from the US. So we had to train staff to understand that they should truly give a good experience to everybody. We were really passionate about developing something that Kenyans would embrace.”

The Java boss believes this focus on Kenyan clientele and local talent are some of the reasons for Java’s success.