imdannyb said: I Love the idea of Ezibota. I'm already a fan. How do you plan to monetise? Surely all your hard work is not going to be for free..... :)

I believe the founding team is developing a variety of services for subscribers and members, including a global directory service and eventually a marketplace.


africaisdonesuffering:

Are Africans Really that Innovative?
The short answer? Yes, of course! Daring to even ask such a question would be quite inexcusable. Nonetheless, this question is often asked and answered with the negative. “No, Africans are not that innovative”. There seems to be a notion that Africans are generally not educated or resourceful enough to be innovative. Why else would there be so much poverty? Africa is still patronized as a continent where excess goods can be dumped, and as a place where impoverished ‘primitive’, ‘tribal’ Africans cannot help themselves. So then, it may seem almost contradictory to suggest that Africans are innovative. 
Before taking such a narrow approach to addressing innovation, it is important to first define what kind of innovation is being referred to. If one is referring to entrepreneurial and social innovation, a culture of such innovation is very much alive in Africa, and perhaps even more so than in other continents. Many citizens of African countries turn to entrepreneurial innovation as a means of survival, independent of formal business structures.
continue reading

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.
We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.
Join our mailing list for community updates, discounted membership plans, and sneak peeks of the services offered on our new platform. 

africaisdonesuffering:

Are Africans Really that Innovative?

The short answer? Yes, of course! Daring to even ask such a question would be quite inexcusable. Nonetheless, this question is often asked and answered with the negative. “No, Africans are not that innovative”. There seems to be a notion that Africans are generally not educated or resourceful enough to be innovative. Why else would there be so much poverty? Africa is still patronized as a continent where excess goods can be dumped, and as a place where impoverished ‘primitive’, ‘tribal’ Africans cannot help themselves. So then, it may seem almost contradictory to suggest that Africans are innovative. 

Before taking such a narrow approach to addressing innovation, it is important to first define what kind of innovation is being referred to. If one is referring to entrepreneurial and social innovation, a culture of such innovation is very much alive in Africa, and perhaps even more so than in other continents. Many citizens of African countries turn to entrepreneurial innovation as a means of survival, independent of formal business structures.

continue reading

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.

We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.

Join our mailing list for community updates, discounted membership plans, and sneak peeks of the services offered on our new platform. 

(via africaisdonesuffering)

My kind of place: Lusaka, Zambia, is an alternative taste of Africa | The National
Some cities hold visitors at arm’s length; Lusaka welcomes them with open arms. Stop to ask directions and you’re often personally escorted to your destination. Knock on the wrong door and you’ll be invited in for tea.
Everyone, from vegetable-sellers by the side of the road to taxi drivers, has time for a conversation. The city’s friendliness is no accident.
Zambia’s bloodless independence was ushered in with the slogan “One nation, one people” and this sense of togetherness has contributed to the country’s stability in the past half-century. Many visitors who come to Zambia bypass the capital and fly straight to its famous game parks, but those who stay discover a city that thrives on creative cottage industries.
Spacious bungalows in residential areas have been converted into restaurants and boutiques for handcrafted jewellery, clothing and pottery.
With three million people and a growing middle class, shopping centres like the Levy Junction downtown are bursting with expanded retail offerings. Zambia is situated in southern Africa, which has so far been unaffected by the Ebola virus in the west of the continent. It has banned travellers from affected countries from entering.

My kind of place: Lusaka, Zambia, is an alternative taste of Africa | The National

Some cities hold visitors at arm’s length; Lusaka welcomes them with open arms. Stop to ask directions and you’re often personally escorted to your destination. Knock on the wrong door and you’ll be invited in for tea.

Everyone, from vegetable-sellers by the side of the road to taxi drivers, has time for a conversation. The city’s friendliness is no accident.

Zambia’s bloodless independence was ushered in with the slogan “One nation, one people” and this sense of togetherness has contributed to the country’s stability in the past half-century. Many visitors who come to Zambia bypass the capital and fly straight to its famous game parks, but those who stay discover a city that thrives on creative cottage industries.

Spacious bungalows in residential areas have been converted into restaurants and boutiques for handcrafted jewellery, clothing and pottery.

With three million people and a growing middle class, shopping centres like the Levy Junction downtown are bursting with expanded retail offerings. Zambia is situated in southern Africa, which has so far been unaffected by the Ebola virus in the west of the continent. It has banned travellers from affected countries from entering.

India Promotes 4.6 Billion Dollar Textile Industry in Ethiopia
Biruk Taye, 28, came to inTexpo, an exhibition of Indian textiles at the Sheraton Addis Hotel, in the Lalibela Ball Room with the expectation to find new partners, who will work with agents in Ethiopia.
The exhibition is the first of its kind in Ethiopia for the Indian textile industry. It is organised by the Synthetic & Rayon Textiles Export Promotion Council (SRTEPC) and Exposition UK LTD, in association with the Embassy of India and support from the Ethiopian Chamber of Commerce & Sectoral Associations (ECCSA).

India Promotes 4.6 Billion Dollar Textile Industry in Ethiopia

Biruk Taye, 28, came to inTexpo, an exhibition of Indian textiles at the Sheraton Addis Hotel, in the Lalibela Ball Room with the expectation to find new partners, who will work with agents in Ethiopia.

The exhibition is the first of its kind in Ethiopia for the Indian textile industry. It is organised by the Synthetic & Rayon Textiles Export Promotion Council (SRTEPC) and Exposition UK LTD, in association with the Embassy of India and support from the Ethiopian Chamber of Commerce & Sectoral Associations (ECCSA).

africaisdonesuffering:

africaisdonesuffering:

Madiba.
Tata.
Papa Mandela.
How did you do it? You spent 27 years in prison for your fight against racial segregation. 18 of those 27 years they confined you to a 7×8 foot concrete cell and allowed only one visit and one letter per year. You were abused and your lungs and sight were permanently damaged due to the hard labor you were forced to perform. Yet when you were finally freed, you forgave. You loved. You held no grudges.
How did you do it Tata?
I will never be able to personally ask you that question but I thank you. My cheeks are warm and my eyes burn with tears. My heart is heavy and my spirit is weak but I will dance for you Madiba. I will sing for Tata. I will celebrate you.  I will love you home to our ancestors. They are waiting for you. They are singing and chanting “Welcome home son.” They are so proud of you. You have fought a hard fight for our people and they are proud of you.
I am proud of you.
Ndiyabulela Tata.
-Bilphena Yahwon

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.
We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.
Join our mailing list for community updates, discounted membership plans, and sneak peeks of the services offered on our new platform. 

africaisdonesuffering:

africaisdonesuffering:

Madiba.

Tata.

Papa Mandela.

How did you do it? You spent 27 years in prison for your fight against racial segregation. 18 of those 27 years they confined you to a 7×8 foot concrete cell and allowed only one visit and one letter per year. You were abused and your lungs and sight were permanently damaged due to the hard labor you were forced to perform. Yet when you were finally freed, you forgave. You loved. You held no grudges.

How did you do it Tata?

I will never be able to personally ask you that question but I thank you. My cheeks are warm and my eyes burn with tears. My heart is heavy and my spirit is weak but I will dance for you Madiba. I will sing for Tata. I will celebrate you.  I will love you home to our ancestors. They are waiting for you. They are singing and chanting “Welcome home son.” They are so proud of you. You have fought a hard fight for our people and they are proud of you.

I am proud of you.

Ndiyabulela Tata.

-Bilphena Yahwon

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.

We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.

Join our mailing list for community updates, discounted membership plans, and sneak peeks of the services offered on our new platform. 

From Timbuktu Chronicles:

Global beauty ambassador Eryca Freemantle talks about: how the international make-up brands are investing in Africa; why women of color spend more on beauty products than their white counterparts; the kinds of beauty products the international brands have for women of colour; local beauty brands in Nigeria; and the massive interest from Nigeria in a competition for hairdressers and make-up artists.

(Source: earth2infini)

African fashion designer shoots for the stars - CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Naledi Lifestyle store sells clothes and home products in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania
Kemi Kalikawe creates products that bring together African and Western styles
Before starting her business Kalikawe studied marketing in England
Kalikawe struggled to find a place to base herself in Dar Es Salaam

African fashion designer shoots for the stars - CNN

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Naledi Lifestyle store sells clothes and home products in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania
  • Kemi Kalikawe creates products that bring together African and Western styles
  • Before starting her business Kalikawe studied marketing in England
  • Kalikawe struggled to find a place to base herself in Dar Es Salaam

Africa Beyond Ebola by Ana Palacio - Project Syndicate

Among this summer’s grave global worries, the spread of the Ebola virus has monopolized the discussion of Sub-Saharan Africa and reinvigorated hoary notions of disorder and despair – at a time when a new image of a dynamic Africa was emerging. In fact, there is still strong reason for optimism about the region’s prospects.

 Ebola, Boko Haram and E-commerce; An Unlikely Partnership
The logic is simple; with the pervasive fear of the Ebola Outbreak and apprehension over the Boko Haram insurgency, more people are turning to online retail platforms where they get what they need- from wares to accessories and gadgets, and even foodstuffs, ask ahiaonline.com.
They also get these goods delivered at the convenience of their homes or work-places, can pay with their ATM cards via the internet or PoS, thus no need to even go to the bank to withdraw money. This means the much feared crowded places can be avoided with its attendant risks and hassles inspired by Ebola and Boko haram, especially for the very cautious.

Ebola, Boko Haram and E-commerce; An Unlikely Partnership

The logic is simple; with the pervasive fear of the Ebola Outbreak and apprehension over the Boko Haram insurgency, more people are turning to online retail platforms where they get what they need- from wares to accessories and gadgets, and even foodstuffs, ask ahiaonline.com.

They also get these goods delivered at the convenience of their homes or work-places, can pay with their ATM cards via the internet or PoS, thus no need to even go to the bank to withdraw money. This means the much feared crowded places can be avoided with its attendant risks and hassles inspired by Ebola and Boko haram, especially for the very cautious.

Garbage in, Money Out: My Stroll With Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola | Ebenezar Wikina

When you think of garbage collectors, what comes to mind? Unfortunate poor illiterate men and women who are not certified enough for more ‘honourable’ jobs right? Yeah. This stroll is for you.

After 13 years in the US; with university degrees, an MBA from MIT, and work experience from Fortune 500 companies, Bilikiss decided to do the unexpected.

She returned home to Nigeria to co-found a waste recycling company, Wecyclers, and her vision is enormous. To transform the lives of people with garbage, create jobs, and help build the economy of her beloved motherland, Nigeria, whom she sacrificed a comfortable life abroad for.

What gave her the faith and hope to make such a decision? And how does she plan to make this vision a reality?

These are few things we talked about in course of our conversation. Sit back and enjoy. Here’s my stroll with Bilikiss;