Telling the Lion’s Stories: The Rise and Rise of African Film | Think Africa Press
From international filmmakers, to national film industries, to individuals with iPhones, Africa in film is inspiring growing audiences across and beyond the continent.

Telling the Lion’s Stories: The Rise and Rise of African Film | Think Africa Press

From international filmmakers, to national film industries, to individuals with iPhones, Africa in film is inspiring growing audiences across and beyond the continent.

Repats: Ten stories of African Diaspora who returned home 
Economic trouble in the West, rapidly expanding African economies and the end of many African civil conflicts are contributing to a rise in the number of African migrants returning to their home countries. Ten of them told their stories to The Africa Report.

Repats: Ten stories of African Diaspora who returned home

Economic trouble in the West, rapidly expanding African economies and the end of many African civil conflicts are contributing to a rise in the number of African migrants returning to their home countries. Ten of them told their stories to The Africa Report.

Tabitha Karanja, the CEO of Keroche Breweries:Resilient at 50
For close to 90 years, no Kenyan dared enter the beer market. It took one woman, TABITHA KARANJA, to jump into the dreaded unfair ground for it to move and she, to take her rightful place in the industry. As she turns 50 today, PETER MUIRURI retraces her footsteps from the village to the helm of Keroche Breweries.
Tabitha Mukami Karanja needs no introduction to Kenyans. When the history of astute businesswomen in the continent is written, her part will occupy a generous segment in the record. Her determination to set up a brewery in a country where one company dominated the sector is well documented.
Today, the iron lady of corporate Kenya turns 50. Tabitha, the CEO of Keroche Breweries looks back at her life that started in the hillsides of Kenton near Kijabe. Here, she took care of her younger siblings — five other girls and four boys. After all, she was the first born and could not escape the treacherous bog that was village life.
“I did everything a first born girl is expected to do such as cooking for the family, fetching firewood and water, unless of course, it rained and the water tank got full,” she says.
Little did she know that the humbling chores would one day come in handy as she set out to establish the only indigenous, fully fledged brewery in the region. Tabitha may be the boss, but the power that comes with such a position has not gone to her head.
Her down to earth disposition is evident as she takes us on a brief tour of the company, clad in a white overcoat synonymous with factory workers. Her easy-going nature and charming smile disarm even the stonehearted. At one moment, she stops in the compound to talk to a casual worker cleaning some section of the exterior wall. Next, she is helping a machine operator remove some faulty bottles from the conveyor belt.
he current expansion project will see the company raise its market share that currently stands at five per cent to 20 per cent. The factory will have a capacity to produce 600,000 beer bottles daily from the current 60,000.
“We are not there yet. It is a work in progress,” she quips. While many have given her accolades due to her courageous stand to face up to a giant, Tabitha says taking on the largest beer manufacturer in the region head on was not her prime mission.
“We just saw a market that needed another player,” she says. However, the market she chose would not only cost her the family resources, but also turned her personal life upside down.
Ed’s note: Read her whole story

Tabitha Karanja, the CEO of Keroche Breweries:Resilient at 50

For close to 90 years, no Kenyan dared enter the beer market. It took one woman, TABITHA KARANJA, to jump into the dreaded unfair ground for it to move and she, to take her rightful place in the industry. As she turns 50 today, PETER MUIRURI retraces her footsteps from the village to the helm of Keroche Breweries.

Tabitha Mukami Karanja needs no introduction to Kenyans. When the history of astute businesswomen in the continent is written, her part will occupy a generous segment in the record. Her determination to set up a brewery in a country where one company dominated the sector is well documented.

Today, the iron lady of corporate Kenya turns 50. Tabitha, the CEO of Keroche Breweries looks back at her life that started in the hillsides of Kenton near Kijabe. Here, she took care of her younger siblings — five other girls and four boys. After all, she was the first born and could not escape the treacherous bog that was village life.

“I did everything a first born girl is expected to do such as cooking for the family, fetching firewood and water, unless of course, it rained and the water tank got full,” she says.

Little did she know that the humbling chores would one day come in handy as she set out to establish the only indigenous, fully fledged brewery in the region. Tabitha may be the boss, but the power that comes with such a position has not gone to her head.

Her down to earth disposition is evident as she takes us on a brief tour of the company, clad in a white overcoat synonymous with factory workers. Her easy-going nature and charming smile disarm even the stonehearted. At one moment, she stops in the compound to talk to a casual worker cleaning some section of the exterior wall. Next, she is helping a machine operator remove some faulty bottles from the conveyor belt.

he current expansion project will see the company raise its market share that currently stands at five per cent to 20 per cent. The factory will have a capacity to produce 600,000 beer bottles daily from the current 60,000.

“We are not there yet. It is a work in progress,” she quips. While many have given her accolades due to her courageous stand to face up to a giant, Tabitha says taking on the largest beer manufacturer in the region head on was not her prime mission.

“We just saw a market that needed another player,” she says. However, the market she chose would not only cost her the family resources, but also turned her personal life upside down.

Ed’s note: Read her whole story

 South Africa Eyes Closer Ties With Hollywood
Tata Motors enters Algerian market with passenger vehicle range - Livemint
Perspective: Segmenting the African Middle Class without dollar figures
That is, rather than simply segmenting by range of daily expenditure i.e. $2 to $4 or $10 to $20 a day, what if we took a closer look at the reasons behind the spending and segmented by consumer mindset and buyer behaviour. After all, given the size of the informal sector in the majority of African countries and the percentage of population relying on irregular income streams from a variety of sources, few can confidently expect to spend exactly $4 each day. There might be times of abundance when hundreds of dollars may be available, and big ticket items purchased like colour television sets, offset by times of scarcity when one might just be making ends meet.
Variability in cash flow is an inherent characteristic of entrepreneurship, regardless of income bracket or revenue sources. Furthermore, we can add geography as a factor, since urban expenditure is of a highly different nature than that in rural regions. Taking all of this (and more, based on years of observations in the field among consumers) here is my version of consumer segmentation of the same demographic as covered in the chart above.
Descriptive segmentation of consumer behaviour - Do read the rest of the post

Perspective: Segmenting the African Middle Class without dollar figures

That is, rather than simply segmenting by range of daily expenditure i.e. $2 to $4 or $10 to $20 a day, what if we took a closer look at the reasons behind the spending and segmented by consumer mindset and buyer behaviour. After all, given the size of the informal sector in the majority of African countries and the percentage of population relying on irregular income streams from a variety of sources, few can confidently expect to spend exactly $4 each day. There might be times of abundance when hundreds of dollars may be available, and big ticket items purchased like colour television sets, offset by times of scarcity when one might just be making ends meet.

Variability in cash flow is an inherent characteristic of entrepreneurship, regardless of income bracket or revenue sources. Furthermore, we can add geography as a factor, since urban expenditure is of a highly different nature than that in rural regions. Taking all of this (and more, based on years of observations in the field among consumers) here is my version of consumer segmentation of the same demographic as covered in the chart above.

Descriptive segmentation of consumer behaviour - Do read the rest of the post

Ethiopia - Doing it the Japanese way
The Japanese workplace philosophy of Kaizen is sweeping all before it in factories and workshops in Ethiopia. The philosophy, developed by Japan after World War II to make the most of meagre resources through efficiency, seems to be a perfect fit for Ethiopia’s industrial needs. James Jeffrey made the rounds of businesses in Addis Ababa to find out how the idea works and with what results.

Ethiopia - Doing it the Japanese way

The Japanese workplace philosophy of Kaizen is sweeping all before it in factories and workshops in Ethiopia. The philosophy, developed by Japan after World War II to make the most of meagre resources through efficiency, seems to be a perfect fit for Ethiopia’s industrial needs. James Jeffrey made the rounds of businesses in Addis Ababa to find out how the idea works and with what results.

 Why Won’t the #WhiteSaviourComplex Go Away? | Think Africa Press
One of the most intrinsic characteristics of the white saviour complex is its ability to engrain and spread the notion that Westerners are the solution to African problems.
This requires portraying the latter as helpless and recirculating images of abandonment and violence or innocence and primitivism while ignoring alternative and just as available images.
Another trait of the white saviour complex is that unlike the imperial and top-down ‘white man’s burden’, it takes place in a shared virtual space between the saviour and the people being saved and in a world in which the goals, personalities and projects of white saviours can be immediately beamed out, as well as commented on and liked or retweeted, into the worlds of Africans themselves.
This can undermine the work of Africans in their own communities. Africans are, after all, actively mobilising new technologies and social media to shape their own worlds and engage directly with the ways that others represent them.
So why, even in these shared spaces, do narratives in which Africans are just the backdrop to American saviours’ stories still persist?
Why do even influential writers such as Nicolas Kristof, for example, argue that his readers will not care about stories about Africa unless he puts the American centre stage?
These are some of the questions our film FRAMED tries to answer, while also showing that Africans such as author and commentator Binyavanga Wainaina and photographer and activist Boniface Mwangi are not exceptions but simply a couple of the strong, visionary, innovative and passionate Africans that are struggling to make things better in the real and virtual worlds.

 Why Won’t the #WhiteSaviourComplex Go Away? | Think Africa Press

One of the most intrinsic characteristics of the white saviour complex is its ability to engrain and spread the notion that Westerners are the solution to African problems.

This requires portraying the latter as helpless and recirculating images of abandonment and violence or innocence and primitivism while ignoring alternative and just as available images.

Another trait of the white saviour complex is that unlike the imperial and top-down ‘white man’s burden’, it takes place in a shared virtual space between the saviour and the people being saved and in a world in which the goals, personalities and projects of white saviours can be immediately beamed out, as well as commented on and liked or retweeted, into the worlds of Africans themselves.

This can undermine the work of Africans in their own communities. Africans are, after all, actively mobilising new technologies and social media to shape their own worlds and engage directly with the ways that others represent them.

So why, even in these shared spaces, do narratives in which Africans are just the backdrop to American saviours’ stories still persist?

Why do even influential writers such as Nicolas Kristof, for example, argue that his readers will not care about stories about Africa unless he puts the American centre stage?

These are some of the questions our film FRAMED tries to answer, while also showing that Africans such as author and commentator Binyavanga Wainaina and photographer and activist Boniface Mwangi are not exceptions but simply a couple of the strong, visionary, innovative and passionate Africans that are struggling to make things better in the real and virtual worlds.

Chris Kirubi’s Runda Project: Two Rivers set to be East Africa’s Largest Shopping Mall

Runda is set to become home of Kenya and East Africa’s biggest shopping mall. The concrete wonder dubbed Two Rivers will be at the heart of the affluent Runda, Gigiri, Muthaiga and Nyali neighbourhoods. The entire complex, which will also include a 5 starhotel, residential apartments and an office park, will be located on a 100 acre piece of land, a few minutes from the UN complex and several embassies.

The whole project is estimated to cost around Sh60 billion. Of the 62,000 square meters of GLA retail tenants, just under 50% are international clients including international supermarket chain, Carrefour hypermarket on 10,000 sqm as the anchor tenant. This will be the second Carrefour in Africa and the first in the region.

The Two Rivers Lifestyle Centre is 50% let by Value; Construction is at the sub structure stage with an expected completion date of September 2015. The Openingdate of the mall is October 2015 geared for the Christmas shopping. Two rivers is owned by Centum Investement where Chris Kirubi is the majority shareholder.

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With her new company, Eleni Gabre-Madhin aims to take the commodity exchange momentum that started with the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange, to the rest of Africa. Report by James Jeffrey in Addis Ababa.

With her new company, Eleni Gabre-Madhin aims to take the commodity exchange momentum that started with the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange, to the rest of Africa. Report by James Jeffrey in Addis Ababa.