Welcome to Loba Lingala!, the new English guide to Lingala, one of the principal languages of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and its capital city, Kinshasa.
Author Thomas Yocum and illustrator Alban Low have developed Loba Lingala!, to make it easier for English-speakers to learn Lingala, which is spoken by of millions of people in West-Central Africa.
The book – the first English-Lingala grammar guide published in 50 years – uses a fun, approachable format designed to get people speaking as soon as they start learning. It includes information about the language and culture, an up-to-date English-Lingala/Lingala-English dictionary, memorization aids and verb lists for fast and easy reference.
This approach is complemented by Alban’s brilliant, original illustrations of daily life in Kinshasa.
Loba Lingala! is a free publication available as a download from this site. We’ve split the book into seven sections for easier downloading to better cope with the often sloth-like speed of the Internet connections prevalent in many parts of the world.
We’ve also provided the complete text of the book for those with faster services. In the future we’ll be adding options that will include the illustrations; we’re currently experimenting to see how best to do that.
Although it is a free publication, some restrictions apply.
Loba Lingala! by Thomas Yocum is copyrighted in 2014 by YoYo Communications Ltd. All rights are reserved. Apart from any permitted use under UK copyright law, no part of this publication may be republished without the prior written permission of Sampson Low Ltd., the publisher. For permission to reproduce extracts in whole or in part, please email us at lobalingala@outlook.com.
Loba Lingala | Learn and Speak Lingala

Welcome to Loba Lingala!, the new English guide to Lingala, one of the principal languages of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and its capital city, Kinshasa.

Author Thomas Yocum and illustrator Alban Low have developed Loba Lingala!, to make it easier for English-speakers to learn Lingala, which is spoken by of millions of people in West-Central Africa.

The book – the first English-Lingala grammar guide published in 50 years – uses a fun, approachable format designed to get people speaking as soon as they start learning. It includes information about the language and culture, an up-to-date English-Lingala/Lingala-English dictionary, memorization aids and verb lists for fast and easy reference.

This approach is complemented by Alban’s brilliant, original illustrations of daily life in Kinshasa.

Loba Lingala! is a free publication available as a download from this site. We’ve split the book into seven sections for easier downloading to better cope with the often sloth-like speed of the Internet connections prevalent in many parts of the world.

We’ve also provided the complete text of the book for those with faster services. In the future we’ll be adding options that will include the illustrations; we’re currently experimenting to see how best to do that.

Although it is a free publication, some restrictions apply.

Loba Lingala! by Thomas Yocum is copyrighted in 2014 by YoYo Communications Ltd. All rights are reserved. Apart from any permitted use under UK copyright law, no part of this publication may be republished without the prior written permission of Sampson Low Ltd., the publisher. For permission to reproduce extracts in whole or in part, please email us at lobalingala@outlook.com.

Loba Lingala | Learn and Speak Lingala

Congolese: Returning home and building a dream - CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic of Congo, is experiencing a construction boom
Many Congolese are returning from abroad to build businesses at home
Local entrepreneurs say their hard work is starting to pay off

Congolese: Returning home and building a dream - CNN

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic of Congo, is experiencing a construction boom
  • Many Congolese are returning from abroad to build businesses at home
  • Local entrepreneurs say their hard work is starting to pay off
Soon, Nigeria will have its very own awesome gaming event. It’s called the West Africa Gaming Expo, or WAGE, and it’s taking place at the Oriental Hotel Lagos in late September.
We have rAge, West Africa has WAGE

Soon, Nigeria will have its very own awesome gaming event. It’s called the West Africa Gaming Expo, or WAGE, and it’s taking place at the Oriental Hotel Lagos in late September.

We have rAge, West Africa has WAGE

First bottles of Ethiopian wine produced by French firm Castel | The Guardian
Half of 1.2m bottles of Rift Valley wine are intended for export, with company planning to double production

First bottles of Ethiopian wine produced by French firm Castel | The Guardian

Half of 1.2m bottles of Rift Valley wine are intended for export, with company planning to double production

staff:

It’s that semester again. “Fall.” Come spend it as an intern for Tumblr. 

Email your resume, Tumblr URL, and a short cover letter to jobs@tumblr.com, and include the team you’re applying to in the subject line. 

Plus: Fall in New York City. Best season, no contest. 

PayPal signs `tens of thousands` customers in Nigeria - Africa | Moneyweb

PayPal has signed up “tens of thousand” of Nigerians in its first week of operating in Africa’s biggest economy, with consumers already purchasing items from Britain, China and the United States via its online platform, a company official said.

Ivory Coast Stallholders Turn to Digital Marketplace
Few have access to them or have even heard of them. Instead, Kaymu, whose website declares it the “number one marketplace in emerging countries”, is rapidly cornering the market.
It is the brainchild of e-commerce group, Africa Internet Holding, backed by Rocket Internet, the incubator founded by the German Samwer brothers famous for making millions by cloning digital businesses.
Launched just two years ago Kaymu now has operations in 25 countries and 15 of them are in Africa. While there are other e-commerce sites in Ivory Coast - such as Jumia, Africa’s answer to Amazon, as well as Wasiri and Sigata - Kaymu is the first person-to-person marketplace open to individuals rather than just shops.
Its Ivory Coast operation launched at the start of this year, and many locals are beginning to cotton on to the potential benefits. When I meet Fatoumata Guindo (photo) she is carefully unwrapping a package containing three ceramic cake moulds. She turns them over in her hands, inspecting them, and then moves on to a second package; more cake moulds in different shapes.
"This is the first time I’ve ordered anything online," she tells me. "I’m not too into the internet, you see." Madame Guindo, in her 60s and the wife of the local imam, has just received her first order from Kaymu. A little sceptical of buying anything at first, she now thinks e-commerce could be the future. "Yes, it’s possible. This can happen," she says.
Wholesalers
In Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s economic capital, Kaymu’s country manager Mehdi Ben Abroug takes me to Adjame, the country’s biggest market. From fruit and veg, to jewellery, to washing machines, the tightly packed stalls sell absolutely everything. The smells, colours and sounds are so intense, a few hours of browsing leaves you exhausted. It is where Kaymu first began to recruit its “sellers”.
"These guys in this market have very low margins because they are wholesalers," explains Mr Abroug. "They go to Dubai, to China and bring back containers and they sell as wholesalers so the margin on the product is really low."
But on Kaymu, he says, they can sell directly to the customer and get a higher margin. More than 200 market sellers in Adjame now have a presence on the e-commerce marketplace. It works in the same way as eBay in that anyone can use the site to sell anything, so-called customer-to-customer.
Kaymu helps sellers post pictures of their products on the website, arranges collection and delivery of the goods, and takes 10-20% commission of every item sold. Take-up of the new site has been faster in Ivory Coast than any other country on the continent.
Africa chief executive Elias Schulze explains that the country’s “tradition of private sector vibrancy” and “strong mobile and internet backbone” has been a huge part of the company’s success here. He adds that “the emerging middle class who are largely tech-savvy and hungry for real price and product discovery” are ready to buy online.
Increased profits
Demba Barradji, 26, the manager of Barradji & Fils, a jewellery shop in Adjame, stands behind his counter as the Kaymu rep asks him to sign the forms for today’s collection. “I chose Kaymu for my business to grow,” he says. “[Profits] have already increased by around 20-25%. It’s a good business for Africa and for Ivory Coast - a business that has a future.”
He pours the gold chains and glittery watches he bought in Thailand into the Kaymu pouches ready for delivery. “To start with I didn’t have much confidence in Kaymu because of cyber-criminality,” he says. “But now there hasn’t been any problems or scams. It’s OK.”
And would he close up shop and transfer everything online? “Yes. Why not close my shop, as I will make more money,” he says.
Up the road from Mr Barradji’s shop, 27-year-old Abdul Affiz Jewar manages his family’s cosmetics store, well-known in Adjame for its cheap beauty products. He also joined Kaymu a few months ago but has not seen the same types of increase in profits. He puts this down to the fact that it is “cheaper for my customers to buy things in the shop”.
Delivery costs of about $3 to $4 per item, make it hard for him to be competitive online. “I can’t imagine closing my shop and selling only online because I have lots of clients who I would lose,” he concludes.
Ivory Coast Stallholders Turn to Digital Marketplace

Ivory Coast Stallholders Turn to Digital Marketplace

Few have access to them or have even heard of them. Instead, Kaymu, whose website declares it the “number one marketplace in emerging countries”, is rapidly cornering the market.

It is the brainchild of e-commerce group, Africa Internet Holding, backed by Rocket Internet, the incubator founded by the German Samwer brothers famous for making millions by cloning digital businesses.

Launched just two years ago Kaymu now has operations in 25 countries and 15 of them are in Africa. While there are other e-commerce sites in Ivory Coast - such as Jumia, Africa’s answer to Amazon, as well as Wasiri and Sigata - Kaymu is the first person-to-person marketplace open to individuals rather than just shops.

Its Ivory Coast operation launched at the start of this year, and many locals are beginning to cotton on to the potential benefits. When I meet Fatoumata Guindo (photo) she is carefully unwrapping a package containing three ceramic cake moulds. She turns them over in her hands, inspecting them, and then moves on to a second package; more cake moulds in different shapes.

"This is the first time I’ve ordered anything online," she tells me. "I’m not too into the internet, you see." Madame Guindo, in her 60s and the wife of the local imam, has just received her first order from Kaymu. A little sceptical of buying anything at first, she now thinks e-commerce could be the future. "Yes, it’s possible. This can happen," she says.

Wholesalers

In Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s economic capital, Kaymu’s country manager Mehdi Ben Abroug takes me to Adjame, the country’s biggest market. From fruit and veg, to jewellery, to washing machines, the tightly packed stalls sell absolutely everything. The smells, colours and sounds are so intense, a few hours of browsing leaves you exhausted. It is where Kaymu first began to recruit its “sellers”.

"These guys in this market have very low margins because they are wholesalers," explains Mr Abroug. "They go to Dubai, to China and bring back containers and they sell as wholesalers so the margin on the product is really low."

But on Kaymu, he says, they can sell directly to the customer and get a higher margin. More than 200 market sellers in Adjame now have a presence on the e-commerce marketplace. It works in the same way as eBay in that anyone can use the site to sell anything, so-called customer-to-customer.

Kaymu helps sellers post pictures of their products on the website, arranges collection and delivery of the goods, and takes 10-20% commission of every item sold. Take-up of the new site has been faster in Ivory Coast than any other country on the continent.

Africa chief executive Elias Schulze explains that the country’s “tradition of private sector vibrancy” and “strong mobile and internet backbone” has been a huge part of the company’s success here. He adds that “the emerging middle class who are largely tech-savvy and hungry for real price and product discovery” are ready to buy online.

Increased profits

Demba Barradji, 26, the manager of Barradji & Fils, a jewellery shop in Adjame, stands behind his counter as the Kaymu rep asks him to sign the forms for today’s collection. “I chose Kaymu for my business to grow,” he says. “[Profits] have already increased by around 20-25%. It’s a good business for Africa and for Ivory Coast - a business that has a future.”

He pours the gold chains and glittery watches he bought in Thailand into the Kaymu pouches ready for delivery. “To start with I didn’t have much confidence in Kaymu because of cyber-criminality,” he says. “But now there hasn’t been any problems or scams. It’s OK.”

And would he close up shop and transfer everything online? “Yes. Why not close my shop, as I will make more money,” he says.

Up the road from Mr Barradji’s shop, 27-year-old Abdul Affiz Jewar manages his family’s cosmetics store, well-known in Adjame for its cheap beauty products. He also joined Kaymu a few months ago but has not seen the same types of increase in profits. He puts this down to the fact that it is “cheaper for my customers to buy things in the shop”.

Delivery costs of about $3 to $4 per item, make it hard for him to be competitive online. “I can’t imagine closing my shop and selling only online because I have lots of clients who I would lose,” he concludes.

Ivory Coast Stallholders Turn to Digital Marketplace

Rwanda begins online registration of newborns, deaths, marriages, divorces | HumanIPO

One Man’s Dream Of Mechanizing Agriculture in Sierra Leone | Africa Agribusiness
FINIC Industries is an agro-based national industrialization center that specializes in manufacturing of machinery and equipment used in processing a variety of agricultural products. The machinery includes Biomass Gasifiers, Cassava Grating Machines, Coffee and Rice Mills, Multi Juice Extraction Machines, Palm Fruit Threshers and Rice Destoners. FINIC has even manufactured its own Condom Vending Machines that are intended to be used at various entertainment centers around the country.
The following is an exclusive interview with Mr. Foday Melvin Kamara, the quiet, unassuming but versatile Founder and Managing Director of FINIC Industries, SL Ltd.

One Man’s Dream Of Mechanizing Agriculture in Sierra Leone | Africa Agribusiness

FINIC Industries is an agro-based national industrialization center that specializes in manufacturing of machinery and equipment used in processing a variety of agricultural products. The machinery includes Biomass Gasifiers, Cassava Grating Machines, Coffee and Rice Mills, Multi Juice Extraction Machines, Palm Fruit Threshers and Rice Destoners. FINIC has even manufactured its own Condom Vending Machines that are intended to be used at various entertainment centers around the country.

The following is an exclusive interview with Mr. Foday Melvin Kamara, the quiet, unassuming but versatile Founder and Managing Director of FINIC Industries, SL Ltd.