imdannyb said: I Love the idea of Ezibota. I'm already a fan. How do you plan to monetise? Surely all your hard work is not going to be for free..... :)

prepaidafrica:

I believe the founding team is developing a variety of services for subscribers and members, including a global directory service and eventually a marketplace.

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Trends shaping Nigeria's mobile data market - CNBC Africa

Nigeria’s telecommunication industry continues to grow and is the largest mobile market in Sub-Saharan Africa.

With over 125 million mobile phone subscribers, and four major mobile service providers including MTN, Bharti Airtel, Globacom and Etisalat who have invested billions of US dollars into base stations and fibre optic transmission to support the country’s increasing bandwidth demand, the mobile data market has grown significantly.

According to Kamar Abass, managing director of Ericsson Nigeria, the country’s over 50 million internet subscribers are shaping the mobile data market in Africa’s biggest economy.

“Some of the big trends are the ones you would recognise globally. Social network is enormously big but the fundamentals in Nigeria where there is no significant fixed network means that mobile is the means of accessing the internet to the vast majority of people and in relation,” Abass said.

The telecommunications and information services sector contributed 6.97 trillion naira, which is 8.68 per cent to the West African country economy. During the country’s rebasing the telecommunications sector outweighed its performance in the rebased GDP figures.

Nigeria’s market penetration was about 75 per cent, however the country still has challenges such as network congestion and quality of service which is blocking the country to achieve its potential growth in the telecoms industry.

“My sense in Nigeria is that even though economically there may be some challenges, the reality is that mobility is an efficient means of people doing business far more efficiently that many other things like taking transport to go to meetings or going out to physically investigate things rather than dialling up the web. So my sense is that mobility gives people a level of efficiency,” Abass explained.

The African Growth Miracle - The New Indian Express
Where will you find the fastest growing economies in the world this year? Among the newly industrialised states of South-East Asia, with their turbo-charged export industries? Among the oil-rich statelets of the Gulf? Or the liberalised, free market economies of Eastern Europe? Actually, it is none of those.
The really rapid expansion right now is in Africa, and in sub-Saharan Africa in particular. Countries such as Mozambique and Ghana are now notching up the kind of 7.5pc-plus annual growth rates that until recently only China could manage.
Plenty of people are quick to dismiss the African growth miracle as nothing more than a short-term boost from foreign aid, or at best from rising commodity prices. They still complain that the great capitalist powers are keeping Africa down, and the old colonial powers are being replaced by newer ones as China takes ever bigger stakes in the continent. But none of that is really true.
What is powering African growth are the same crucial factors that powered growth in Europe 150 years ago, North America 120 years ago and much of Asia in the decades after the Second World War. Industrialisation and free markets.
True, Africa still has plenty of problems and its development is still fragile but, if it can keep going the way it is right now, there is no reason why it can’t be the great growth story of the first half of this century.
Economists specialising in the region refer to what they call the ‘BBC syndrome’ to explain why African growth remains one of the under-appreciated factors in the global economy. Mainstream news broadcasters spend so much time focusing on regional wars and famines they miss out on most of what is happening in what is, after all, a very big continent.
It is rather like concentrating on the conflict in the Ukraine to describe the whole of Europe.
There is a lot of other stuff going on. In reality, Africa is developing very fast.
An analysis of World Bank projections of global growth for the years 2013-15 showed that, of the 20 fastest growing economies in the world, 11 were in Africa. Sierra Leone, on 25pc growth, was probably an outlier — its economy was so bombed out, just returning to normal meant a big bounce back — but the rest are countries chalking up high, consistent growth rates.

The African Growth Miracle - The New Indian Express

Where will you find the fastest growing economies in the world this year? Among the newly industrialised states of South-East Asia, with their turbo-charged export industries? Among the oil-rich statelets of the Gulf? Or the liberalised, free market economies of Eastern Europe? Actually, it is none of those.

The really rapid expansion right now is in Africa, and in sub-Saharan Africa in particular. Countries such as Mozambique and Ghana are now notching up the kind of 7.5pc-plus annual growth rates that until recently only China could manage.

Plenty of people are quick to dismiss the African growth miracle as nothing more than a short-term boost from foreign aid, or at best from rising commodity prices. They still complain that the great capitalist powers are keeping Africa down, and the old colonial powers are being replaced by newer ones as China takes ever bigger stakes in the continent. But none of that is really true.

What is powering African growth are the same crucial factors that powered growth in Europe 150 years ago, North America 120 years ago and much of Asia in the decades after the Second World War. Industrialisation and free markets.

True, Africa still has plenty of problems and its development is still fragile but, if it can keep going the way it is right now, there is no reason why it can’t be the great growth story of the first half of this century.

Economists specialising in the region refer to what they call the ‘BBC syndrome’ to explain why African growth remains one of the under-appreciated factors in the global economy. Mainstream news broadcasters spend so much time focusing on regional wars and famines they miss out on most of what is happening in what is, after all, a very big continent.

It is rather like concentrating on the conflict in the Ukraine to describe the whole of Europe.

There is a lot of other stuff going on. In reality, Africa is developing very fast.

An analysis of World Bank projections of global growth for the years 2013-15 showed that, of the 20 fastest growing economies in the world, 11 were in Africa. Sierra Leone, on 25pc growth, was probably an outlier — its economy was so bombed out, just returning to normal meant a big bounce back — but the rest are countries chalking up high, consistent growth rates.

 Poli Lotus International Center, Ethiopia’s first urban complex
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – Poli Lotus International Center, the first urban complex project in Ethiopia developed by Chinese investment, was opened on Monday in Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa.
The project executed by Tsehay Real Estate, which is co- invested by the China’s CGC Overseas Construction Group (CGCOC) and Chinese investor Qian Xiao, includes public and residential buildings in function layout. The 150 million-U.S.-dollar project covers an area of 200,000 square kilometers, and is expected to finish in 2017.
The public building comprises high standard hotel, international A grade standard office,supermarket, banks shopping center and pedestrian commercial street.

Poli Lotus International Center, Ethiopia’s first urban complex

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – Poli Lotus International Center, the first urban complex project in Ethiopia developed by Chinese investment, was opened on Monday in Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa.

The project executed by Tsehay Real Estate, which is co- invested by the China’s CGC Overseas Construction Group (CGCOC) and Chinese investor Qian Xiao, includes public and residential buildings in function layout. The 150 million-U.S.-dollar project covers an area of 200,000 square kilometers, and is expected to finish in 2017.

The public building comprises high standard hotel, international A grade standard office,supermarket, banks shopping center and pedestrian commercial street.

Mobile Money Is Driving Africa’s Cashless Future - Niti Bhan - Harvard Business Review

imdannyb said: I Love the idea of Ezibota. I'm already a fan. How do you plan to monetise? Surely all your hard work is not going to be for free..... :)

I believe the founding team is developing a variety of services for subscribers and members, including a global directory service and eventually a marketplace.


africaisdonesuffering:

Are Africans Really that Innovative?
The short answer? Yes, of course! Daring to even ask such a question would be quite inexcusable. Nonetheless, this question is often asked and answered with the negative. “No, Africans are not that innovative”. There seems to be a notion that Africans are generally not educated or resourceful enough to be innovative. Why else would there be so much poverty? Africa is still patronized as a continent where excess goods can be dumped, and as a place where impoverished ‘primitive’, ‘tribal’ Africans cannot help themselves. So then, it may seem almost contradictory to suggest that Africans are innovative. 
Before taking such a narrow approach to addressing innovation, it is important to first define what kind of innovation is being referred to. If one is referring to entrepreneurial and social innovation, a culture of such innovation is very much alive in Africa, and perhaps even more so than in other continents. Many citizens of African countries turn to entrepreneurial innovation as a means of survival, independent of formal business structures.
continue reading

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.
We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.
Join our mailing list for community updates, discounted membership plans, and sneak peeks of the services offered on our new platform. 

africaisdonesuffering:

Are Africans Really that Innovative?

The short answer? Yes, of course! Daring to even ask such a question would be quite inexcusable. Nonetheless, this question is often asked and answered with the negative. “No, Africans are not that innovative”. There seems to be a notion that Africans are generally not educated or resourceful enough to be innovative. Why else would there be so much poverty? Africa is still patronized as a continent where excess goods can be dumped, and as a place where impoverished ‘primitive’, ‘tribal’ Africans cannot help themselves. So then, it may seem almost contradictory to suggest that Africans are innovative. 

Before taking such a narrow approach to addressing innovation, it is important to first define what kind of innovation is being referred to. If one is referring to entrepreneurial and social innovation, a culture of such innovation is very much alive in Africa, and perhaps even more so than in other continents. Many citizens of African countries turn to entrepreneurial innovation as a means of survival, independent of formal business structures.

continue reading

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.

We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.

Join our mailing list for community updates, discounted membership plans, and sneak peeks of the services offered on our new platform. 

(via africaisdonesuffering)

My kind of place: Lusaka, Zambia, is an alternative taste of Africa | The National
Some cities hold visitors at arm’s length; Lusaka welcomes them with open arms. Stop to ask directions and you’re often personally escorted to your destination. Knock on the wrong door and you’ll be invited in for tea.
Everyone, from vegetable-sellers by the side of the road to taxi drivers, has time for a conversation. The city’s friendliness is no accident.
Zambia’s bloodless independence was ushered in with the slogan “One nation, one people” and this sense of togetherness has contributed to the country’s stability in the past half-century. Many visitors who come to Zambia bypass the capital and fly straight to its famous game parks, but those who stay discover a city that thrives on creative cottage industries.
Spacious bungalows in residential areas have been converted into restaurants and boutiques for handcrafted jewellery, clothing and pottery.
With three million people and a growing middle class, shopping centres like the Levy Junction downtown are bursting with expanded retail offerings. Zambia is situated in southern Africa, which has so far been unaffected by the Ebola virus in the west of the continent. It has banned travellers from affected countries from entering.

My kind of place: Lusaka, Zambia, is an alternative taste of Africa | The National

Some cities hold visitors at arm’s length; Lusaka welcomes them with open arms. Stop to ask directions and you’re often personally escorted to your destination. Knock on the wrong door and you’ll be invited in for tea.

Everyone, from vegetable-sellers by the side of the road to taxi drivers, has time for a conversation. The city’s friendliness is no accident.

Zambia’s bloodless independence was ushered in with the slogan “One nation, one people” and this sense of togetherness has contributed to the country’s stability in the past half-century. Many visitors who come to Zambia bypass the capital and fly straight to its famous game parks, but those who stay discover a city that thrives on creative cottage industries.

Spacious bungalows in residential areas have been converted into restaurants and boutiques for handcrafted jewellery, clothing and pottery.

With three million people and a growing middle class, shopping centres like the Levy Junction downtown are bursting with expanded retail offerings. Zambia is situated in southern Africa, which has so far been unaffected by the Ebola virus in the west of the continent. It has banned travellers from affected countries from entering.